Judge considers allowing video of George Floyd’s 2019 arrest in trial

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In this image taken from video, Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill presides over pre-trial motions, prior to continuing jury selection, Monday, March 15, 2021, in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. Chauvin is charged in the May 25, 2020, death of George Floyd (Court TV/Pool via AP)

In this image taken from video, Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill presides over pre-trial motions, prior to continuing jury selection, Monday, March 15, 2021, in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. Chauvin is charged in the May 25, 2020, death of George Floyd (Court TV/Pool via AP)

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UPDATED 3:15 PM PT – Thursday, March 18, 2021

The judge in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has been preparing to decide if a video of George Floyd’s 2019 arrest can be used as evidence. On Thursday, Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill announced he will make a decision by the end of the week.

On Tuesday, Chauvin’s defense requested the footage to be entered as evidence. The video reportedly shows Floyd swallowing drugs while struggling with police during a separate arrest. Chauvin’s lawyer has said the video is fair game and ultimately the jury will decide how to interpret it.

In this screen grab from video, defense attorney Eric Nelson speaks as Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill presides over jury selection in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin on Wednesday, March 17, 2021 at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. Chauvin is charged in the May 25, 2020 death of George Floyd. (Court TV, via AP, Pool)

In this screen grab from video, defense attorney Eric Nelson speaks as Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill presides over jury selection in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin on Wednesday, March 17, 2021 at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. (Court TV, via AP, Pool)

 

“But what’s good for the goose is good for the gander,” Defense Attorney Eric Nelson stated. “If I’m making the inference that Mr. Floyd was resisting arrest in the course or he was exaggerating his condition or he was actually experiencing a medical condition that went unrecognized by police officers, the state can theoretically bring in evidence that says ‘hey here is an alternative explanation for that.’”

On Thursday, jury selection in the high-profile case continued.

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