Project Veritas: Top executive touts plan to ‘break up’ Facebook

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A picture taken on May 14, 2012 in Paris, shows an illustration made with a figurine set up in front of Facebook's homepage. Facebook, already assured of becoming one of the most valuable US firms when it goes public later this month, now must convince investors in the next two weeks that it is worth all the hype. Top executives at the world's leading social network have kicked off their all-important road show on Wall Street -- an intense marketing drive ahead of the company's expected trading launch on the tech-heavy Nasdaq on May 18. AFP PHOTO/JOEL SAGET (Photo by Joël SAGET / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP via Getty Images)

A picture taken on May 14, 2012 in Paris, shows an illustration made with a figurine set up in front of Facebook's homepage. Facebook, already assured of becoming one of the most valuable US firms when it goes public later this month, now must convince investors in the next two weeks that it is worth all the hype. Top executives at the world's leading social network have kicked off their all-important road show on Wall Street -- an intense marketing drive ahead of the company's expected trading launch on the tech-heavy Nasdaq on May 18. AFP PHOTO/JOEL SAGET (Photo by Joël SAGET / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP via Getty Images)

A picture taken on May 14, 2012 shows an illustration made with a figurine set up in front of Facebook’s homepage. (Photo by JOEL SAGET/AFP via Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 4:50 PM PT – Monday, March 15, 2021

A new report by Project Veritas revealed Facebook’s plans to break up its business in order to avoid lawsuits over its monopoly in digital services.

Undercover reporting by Project Veritas showed Facebook’s Global Planning Lead Benny Thomas discussing ways to avoid accusations of monopoly.

“Instagram, Facebook, Messenger, Oculus, WhatsApp. They all need to be separate companies,” Thomas said. “It’s too much power when they’re all one together.”

Facebook currently faces lawsuits in 48 states over its predatory business practices, as well as proven claims of a political bias. However, critics said breaking up Facebook would be a deceptive tactic that would not affect its actual monopoly.

“It needs to be broken up the way the telecom companies were broken up. But better than that, because those guys just came back together pretty soon after that, and I hope we’ve learned from that,” Thomas said. “But that’s really the one thing as you said, I would break it up, and I would remove Zuck as the CEO.”

Thomas added Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is “ruling over some 2 billion people, which gives him more power than many heads of state.”

Project Veritas said its latest report exposes the megalomania of Facebook corporate leaders.

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