U.K. ‘vaxi taxis’ help promote COVID-19 vaccinations

OAN Top News

LONDON, ENGLAND - FEBRUARY 28: Jane Anne Short, 75, receives her first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine from Dr Tamara Joffe inside a Vaxi Taxi in Kilburn on February 28, 2021 in London, England. The programme aims to encourage covid-19 vaccine uptake by ferrying patients to vaccination appointments, as well as taking supplies from hospitals to pop-up clinics. (Photo by Hollie Adams/Getty Images)

LONDON, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 28: Jane Anne Short, 75, receives her first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine from Dr Tamara Joffe inside a Vaxi Taxi in Kilburn on February 28, 2021 in London, England. (Photo by Hollie Adams/Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 3:20 PM PT – Saturday, March 6, 2021

A new transportation method called the “Vaxi Taxi” has become available to take people across the U.K. to vaccination centers. Citizens with underlying conditions who are more susceptible to the coronavirus have expressed joy for this new service as it helps them avoid public transportation. Some riders were even vaccinated in the cab and never had to exit.

Meanwhile, more than 30 percent of Britain’s population has received one dose of the vaccine. The goal of the “Vaxi Taxi” is to get more Brits vaccinated and activists have organized pop-up vaccination hubs in less fortunate neighborhoods to do so.

“I think what we are doing is trying to save lives,” Faiths Forum Director Mustafa Field stated. “We are trying to reach the most vulnerable people in different communities…and we’ve had people here today from different faith communities, people with disabilities, elderly people, people with learning difficulties. We want to make this vaccine really accessible. There’s a lot of fear; getting on the bus has a lot of fear.”

LONDON, ENGLAND - FEBRUARY 28: Leslie Reid, 48, waves at the press after receiving his first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine from Dr Tamara Joffe inside a Vaxi Taxi in Kilburn on February 28, 2021 in London, England. The programme aims to encourage covid-19 vaccine uptake by ferrying patients to vaccination appointments, as well as taking supplies from hospitals to pop-up clinics. (Photo by Hollie Adams/Getty Images)

LONDON, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 28: Leslie Reid, 48, waves at the press after receiving his first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine from Dr Tamara Joffe inside a Vaxi Taxi in Kilburn on February 28, 2021 in London, England. The programme aims to encourage covid-19 vaccine uptake by ferrying patients to vaccination appointments, as well as taking supplies from hospitals to pop-up clinics. (Photo by Hollie Adams/Getty Images)

Opening up pop-up vaccine locations has kept people at a safe distance amid the pandemic rather than crowded in one vaccination site. Furthermore, some “Vaxi Taxi” drivers said they explained to passengers why the vaccine is beneficial as many riders expressed hesitation on the way.

“I think it is important that things are clearly explained and that people’s fears where they exist are addressed properly,” GP and Director of COVID Crisis Rescue Dr. Sharon Raymond stated. “I think also people have logistical barriers to accessing vaccinations. Not everyone has private transport [and] some people have been shielding for a long time and are worried about taking public transport and that’s where the ‘Vaxi Taxis’ come in.”

MORE NEWS: More Than 3K Unaccompanied Alien Children Being Held In DHS Custody

Leave a Reply